A comment on "Last Stories and Other Stories"

germansierra:

In “Last Stories and Other Stories”, William T. Vollmann goes all the way from Dante and Rabelais to Latin American baroque, from the icelandic sagas and chivalry novels to the Grimms, Poe and Lovecraft, producing the most extraordinary dark fairy tales of our time. Aged imaginery and rethorics…

Ancient Oceans of Central Kentucky in the wild.
For the record: when someone asks what kind of cake I want for my birthday, the answer is THIS CAKE.

Chasing Ray - Ancient Oceans of Central Kentucky

Oh, this is such a bleak book.

It feels small to write that because I don’t think bleakness is truly appreciated anymore. We get our heartstrings tugged so frequently, so casually by many authors. What David Connerley Nahm does with Ancient Oceans of Kentucky is much more than convenient sadness as a plot point though. He takes sorrow to a whole other level and infuses this novel with so many careful layers of emotion that you feel drained by the end.

A very nice review of Ancient Oceans of Central Kentucky. A Side Note: I’m a fun person to be around in real life.

whiskeypaper:

this Kentucky morning.

whiskeypaper:

this Kentucky morning.

2014-15 Little Fiction Authors Book Preview

little-fiction:

In the spirit of the last week’s Most Ancitipated: Great Second-Half 2014 Book Preview from the Millions, we thought we’d do one ourselves for Little Fiction authors who have books forthcoming this year and next. We’re also including a couple of recently released books from LF authors in case…

Little Fiction includes Ancient Oceans of Central Kentucky in its preview of forthcoming novels by their contributors. They will be publishing my story “A Mountain Where There Is No Mountain” in a few weeks. I am honored and excited.  

laclefdescoeurs:

Cats Being Introduced in the Art of Mouse-Catching by an Owl, c. 1700, Lombard School

These BarBri classes are getting weird.

laclefdescoeurs:

Cats Being Introduced in the Art of Mouse-Catching by an Owl, c. 1700, Lombard School

These BarBri classes are getting weird.

(via pankmagazine)

David Connerley Nahm Recommends... | Poets & Writers

Here is a short thing I wrote for Poets & Writers about finding inspiration. The short version: turtles, garbage, walking.

200 Words: MA TURNER

the-out-door:

(200 Words is a new series debuting today on The Out Door tumblr. Every so often we’ll highlight a new record we like a lot, via a 200-word review by one of us (Marc Masters or Grayson Currin) plus 200 words (or so) from the artist about whatever they choose.)

image

MA TURNER - ZOZ LP (Sophomore Lounge)

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Great words about a great musician.

A first glimpse into the Scott Walker/Sunn O))) recording sessions.
dangerouspoetry:

"While I agree with your point, Josephine, capitalism is an unjust ideal and it won’t work anymore"

dangerouspoetry:

"While I agree with your point, Josephine, capitalism is an unjust ideal and it won’t work anymore"

(Source: priceofliberty, via incredimarc)

#tobyreads: Human Connections and Parallel Lives

A nice review of a few forthcoming books, including Ancient Oceans of Central Kentucky.

"The pacing here is unconventional; the narrative jumps around in time, focusing on Leah in the present day; her childhood, as her life with her parents and brother is shattered; and on the intervening years, when a decent act has unpleasant consequences."

doomandgloomfromthetomb:

John Coltrane Quintet - Falkonercentret, Copenhagen, Denmark, November 20, 1961
Lineup: John Coltrane - Tenor/Soprano SaxEric Dolphy - Alto Sax, fluteMcCoy Tyner - PianoReggie Workman - BassElvin Jones - Drums
For your weekend: Definitely go read the Paris Review's excellent profile of Coltrane biographer Dr. Cuthbert Ormond Simpkins. And definitely take a listen to this wonderful 1961 show from John Coltrane in Copenhagen. It’s a radio broadcast, and the recording quality is pretty solid, despite not serving Tyner or Jones particularly well. The real pleasures come from ‘Trane and Dolphy, who both sound inspired and invigorated by one another. Check out the absolutely swoon-worthy reading of “Naima” for proof of these two players’ chemistry. The opening “Delilah” is a rarity — it doesn’t seem to appear on any of the other recordings from this tour. It’s a treat. Another rarity is simply hearing Coltrane address the audience after a false start on “My Favorite Things.” Dude was not exactly a chatty cathy on stage, to say the least. But the ensuing, almost half-hour long “Favorite Things” is fantastic — despite its length, it’s actually a somewhat gentle reading of the song, at least compared to what would come in later years, with Dolphy’s playful flute solo as a highlight.

doomandgloomfromthetomb:

John Coltrane Quintet - Falkonercentret, Copenhagen, Denmark, November 20, 1961

Lineup: 
John Coltrane - Tenor/Soprano Sax
Eric Dolphy - Alto Sax, flute
McCoy Tyner - Piano
Reggie Workman - Bass
Elvin Jones - Drums

For your weekend: Definitely go read the Paris Review's excellent profile of Coltrane biographer Dr. Cuthbert Ormond Simpkins. And definitely take a listen to this wonderful 1961 show from John Coltrane in Copenhagen. It’s a radio broadcast, and the recording quality is pretty solid, despite not serving Tyner or Jones particularly well. The real pleasures come from ‘Trane and Dolphy, who both sound inspired and invigorated by one another. Check out the absolutely swoon-worthy reading of “Naima” for proof of these two players’ chemistry. The opening “Delilah” is a rarity — it doesn’t seem to appear on any of the other recordings from this tour. It’s a treat. Another rarity is simply hearing Coltrane address the audience after a false start on “My Favorite Things.” Dude was not exactly a chatty cathy on stage, to say the least. But the ensuing, almost half-hour long “Favorite Things” is fantastic — despite its length, it’s actually a somewhat gentle reading of the song, at least compared to what would come in later years, with Dolphy’s playful flute solo as a highlight.

Let Me Ask My Mom if it Is Okay for You to Come Over (XVII)